Emanuel Licha – Striking a Pose

Emanuel Licha

Curated by Marie-Hélène Leblanc & presented in association with PAVED Arts and Musée Régional de Rimouski

January 13–February 11, 2012 in the Main Space

Opening Reception: Friday January 13, 7:00 pm

Curator's Talk: Friday January 13, 6:00 pm

Follow Emanuel Licha's "War Tourist" from 2004 to the present in this series of videos. The War Tourist begins exploring sensationalistic zones of conflict in far-off countries in a strange colonialist attempt to reassure himself of their great distance. But as he follows the real stuff, he is slowly draw back towards home and the hyper-real consumer lifestyle, with stops at a French urban-operations police training ground, a Hollywood-built military facsimile of Iraq in California, and the splendour of unreal Italy in Las Vegas.

EMANUEL LICHA was born in Montreal in 1971. After earning a Master’s degree in urban geography, he pursued his education in visual arts at Concordia University in Montreal, followed by a post-graduate diploma at the Ecole nationale des beauxarts de Lyon, France, in 2001. Licha is associate Professor at the Ecole nationale supérieure d’architecture de Paris-La Villette. He is a member of the Centre for research architecture, Goldsmiths College, University of London.

His work focuses on public space and architecture, leading to a reading of the features of the urban landscape as so many social, historical, and political signs. His recent projects investigate the means by which traumatic and violent events are being looked at, and are shown as video installations.

Presented in association with: PAVED Arts and Musée Régionale de Rimouski.

View posts about Emanuel Licha on the Latitude 53 blog.

Striking A Pose – Prendre Pose

Striking a Pose, debuting Latitude 53, consists of two video works from Emanuel Licha, presented in the same space, War Tourist and How Do We Know What We Know? parallels a visit of post-conflict and post-disaster areas from the point of view of the tourist. These works draw attention towards a dialogue more concerned by the lack of access to conflict zones from a journalistic outlook.

First, the War Tourist is attracted by the pain of others, by the destruction of places affected by war and disaster. The War Tourist integrates the viewer into secure areas, or abandoned spaces, after traumatic events affecting places and people. Five sites are visited: Sarajevo, the suburbs of Paris, New Orleans, Chernobyl and the concentration camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau. The five tours, in which the tourist takes part in a reconstruction of history (a story) through places stricken by suffering, are lead by a guide who sells chaos as fresh bread. They indicate a desire to see without being in danger. It is in a state of post-terror that the War Tourist is looking for growing thrills in areas that again became relatively quiet.

The work How Do We Know What We Know? questions image-making in areas of conflict, whether real or fictitious, and the potential obsolescence of the role of journalists in war zones. It is a perception of the place, as physical space, that is in conflict; generating an ambiguity between reality and fiction. Image-making and usage of images taken by War Tourists, or the protagonists in the video, reposition the role of war correspondents/media who have increasingly greater difficulty accessing areas of conflict. We are constantly bombarded with images of conflict—and this work provides a perspective on the role of images of conflicts, but also on image production systems and information (real or fictional) transmitted by the flow of war images. If we are not present, how can we be certain about the pictures we receive?

The different spaces in the works of Licha become places to produce pictures and participate in the report of witnesses, whether they are journalists, tourist guides, tourists, soldiers or actors. In the exhibition Striking a Pose, photographic opportunities or framing, shows that each image of conflict or chaos is constructed, manufactured and revisited. Both of the works in the exhibition show the difficulty (or fear) of entering a real war zone: whether it is captured when the conflict is over, as in War Tourist, or as it is presented through its contours, as we see it in How Do We Know What We Know? —Marie-Hélène Leblanc


L’exposition Striking a Pose d’Emanuel Licha présentée à Latitude 53 propose les œuvres War Tourist et How do we know what we know?, mettant ainsi en parallèle la visite de zones post-conflictuelles et post-désastres d’un point de vue touristique, avec une œuvre davantage tournée vers l’impossibilité d’accéder aux zones de conflits d’un point de vue journalistique.

En premier lieu, le War Tourist est attiré par la douleur des autres, par la destruction des lieux touchés par la guerre et la catastrophe. Le War Tourist s’intègre dans des zones sécurisées ou délaissées après des événements traumatiques affectant des lieux et des populations. Cinq endroits sont visités : Sarajevo, la banlieue parisienne, la Nouvelle-Orléans, Tchernobyl et le camp de concentration d’Auschwitz-Birkenau. Ces cinq visites guidées, où le touriste prend part à une reconstitution de l’histoire (d’une histoire) à travers des lieux de souffrance par un guide qui vend le chaos comme on vend des pains chauds, font état d’un désir de voir sans être en danger. C’est dans l’après-terreur que le War Tourist recherche un saisissement croissant dans des zones redevenues relativement calmes.

La pièce How do we know what we know? questionne quant à elle la fabrication d’images en zones de conflits, qu’ils soient réels ou fictifs, et la potentielle désuétude du rôle de journaliste en zones de guerre. C’est une perception du lieu, en tant qu’espace physique, qui cadre le conflit, et ainsi génère une ambiguïté entre réalité et fiction. La fabrication d’images et l’utilisation d’images prises par les protagonistes eux-mêmes repositionnent le rôle du correspondant de guerre qui a de plus en plus difficilement accès aux zones de conflit. Cette œuvre offre une perspective sur le rôle des images dans les conflits, mais également sur les systèmes de production d’images et de l’information (réelle ou fictive) qui est transmise par ce flux d’images de guerre. Si nous ne sommes pas présents, comment être certains des images que nous recevons?

Les différents espaces présents dans les œuvres de Licha deviennent des lieux à produire des images et participent à l’exposé des témoins des conflits, soient-ils journaliste, guide touristique, touriste, soldat ou comédien. Dans l’exposition Striking a Pose, l’opportunité photographique, ou le choix du cadrage, démontre que chaque image de conflits ou de chaos est construite, fabriquée et revisitée. Les deux œuvres de l’exposition démontrent la difficulté (ou la peur) d’entrer dans la réelle zone de guerre; soit elle est captée lorsque le conflit est terminé, dans le cas de War Tourist, soit elle est présentée dans ses contours, comme dans How do we know what we know? —Marie-Hélène Leblanc


Artist, writer and curator, Marie-Helene Leblanc holds a Master’s degree in art from the University of Quebec at Chicoutimi. One of her most recent curatorial projects was Objet Indirect Object (2011), co-curated with Steven Loft and presented at DAÏMÖN, AXENéO7, Artengine and SAW Video, and Hommes en voie de distinction (2011) at the Centre d’exposition L’Imagier (Aylmer). Marie-Hélène Leblanc also publishes texts and produces artist’s books on a regular basis.

Artiste, auteur et commissaire, Marie-Hélène Leblanc détient une maîtrise en art de l’Université du Québec à Chicoutimi. Parmi ses récents projets de commissariats on retrouve Objet Indirect Object (2011), co-commissarié avec Steven Loft et présenté à DAÏMÕN, AXENéO7, Artengine et SAW Vidéo, de même que Hommes en voie de distinction (2011), diffusé au Centre d’exposition L’Imagier (Aylmer). Marie-Hélène Leblanc publie aussi des textes et produits des livres d’artiste sur une base régulière.

Emanuel Licha was born in Montreal in 1971. After earning a Master’s degree in urban geography, he pursued his education in visual arts at Concordia University in Montreal, followed by a post-graduate diploma at the Ecole nationale des beauxarts de Lyon, France, in 2001. Licha is associate Professor at the Ecole nationale supérieure d’architecture de Paris-La Villette. He is a member of the Centre for research architecture, Goldsmiths College, University of London.

Emanuel Licha est né à Montréal en 1971. Après l’obtention d’une maîtrise en géographie urbaine, il poursuit ses études en arts visuels à l’Université Concordia, Montréal, puis par le Post-diplôme de l’Ecole nationale des beaux-arts de Lyon en 2001. Licha enseigne à l’Ecole nationale supérieure d’architecture de Paris-La Villette. Il est membre du Centre for Research Architecture, Goldsmiths College, University of London.

©2008 Latitude 53 Contemporary Visual Culture | Designed and Powered by Gystworks