Jorden and David Doody: And All The Queen's Men

And All The Queen's Men

August 9–September 8 in the Main Space

Opening Reception: Thursday, August 9, on the Rooftop Patio

Artist Talk: Friday September 7, at 7:00 pm

David and Jorden Doody share a common focus on the materialism of cultural codification. Their combined individual practices have been heavily influenced by world travel and the cross-pollination of mass media, ritual and fetishistic cultures. Their practice moves freely between new media, sculpture, painting, and collage. This August, they will bring their colourful mixture of media—from painting to bedazzled found objects to electronic motion-triggered sculpture— to edmonton.

View posts about The Doodys on the Latitude 53 Blog


Jorden Blue & David James Doody are both graduates from the University of British Columbia in Critical and Creative Studies. Although each artist offers a uniquely individual approach to the discourse of visual arts, they share a common focus on the materialism of cultural codification. Their combined individual practices have been heavily influenced by world travel and the cross pollination of mass media, ritual and fetishistic cultures. Their practice moves freely between new media, sculpture, and painting.
“As a collaborative team for the past eleven years, we believe that communication has been the foundation of our artistic relationship. A common thread that can be traced throughout our work is that of collage. By sampling freely from a multitude of different sources, we are able to access unlimited individual histories, societal contexts and cultural symbols. For us, collage is more than just cut and paste, it is an immediate sense of being; it is our way of participating in the re-contextualization of our
unfolding culture.”

Through their open processes of art-making they allow happenstance to regurgitate cultural intuition in an act of artistic survival.


And All the Queen's Men

Mixed media artists Jorden and David Doody have worked exclusively as a team for the past 11 years, taking artistic collaboration to a level beyond mere mutual influence and forming a formidable enmeshed artistic duo. Working in tandem, this world of two share a brand of spontaneous passion-filled energy that makes it easy — essential, even—to work side by side. Their talents meld in artistic synergy like a creative snowball rolling down a mountain, picking up ideas and growing in size and speed with nothing in the way. The Doodys’ artistic coupling gives them the freedom to be and create, living a life of art with art encroaching on every act of living. They work in constant collaboration with one another—no feelings of doubt impede their impetus and mutual support to do more and more, becoming truly inspired by every moment.

“Although we both have different skill sets, we conceptualize through all of our concepts together,” David Doody says. “We never turn it off; we spend 120 hours a week together and eat, sleep and fuck art. We both dream and we both paint.”

The Doodys are among the new school of Vancouver artists toppling the walls of tradition in search of a more lucid menagerie of over the top multimedia objects and interactive environments.

The use of assemblage originating in the miniature French window lined with black leatherwork of Duchamp’s ‘Fresh Widow’ (1921), has radically metamorphosed over the past 100 years. By simultaneously embracing painting, collage, sculpture and architecture, artists such as Schwitters defied tradition. Using found pieces in their work and, in doing so, assaulting the belief of approved media and subject matter, they altered the boundaries of legitimate art and set the stage for the assemblage artists of today.

The Doodys’ practice moves freely amongst new media, sculpture and painting, revolving around the interplay of literal and metaphorical, of presence and absence, of outer and inner world, of fantasy and reality, dream and memory. Their work fuses surrealism and social criticism with craftsmanship. They embrace the explicit importance of the found object and its own socio-cultural back story, but at the same time, they bring their individual, unique histories, dreams and aspirations together to create a completely new story. The disparate objects in their work are re-contextualized and create new themes and motifs that are sexy, strange, representational and abstract; accessible yet obscure; macabre as well as humorous. Their art is of the realm of the unbridled dreamscape, exerting a somnambulistic pull that speaks directly to the imagination of the viewer.

—Rachel Zottenberg

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